A Young Iranian Woman Writes

25 January 2012

A young Iranian woman has written to me off and on for a couple of years.  Yesterday she sent a note.

I responded in part with a few questions:

What do young Iranians think about our government and about the Iranian government?  Also, do you think there will be war?

She replied immediately.  I corrected some minor grammar:

“To make the long story short people in Iran, not just youth, hate the government and want to move out of the country as soon as they can.  My sister [deleted] is moving to [deleted] with her husband this July and then when my mother gets retired, me, my younger sister [deleted] and my parents will sell our house and move to live with them.  My father isn’t convinced yet but all he needs is time, I’m sure he will choose to come with us.

“I am a patriot and I will remain one no matter where I am, but lets face it. Things are bad and getting worse as every day goes by. I have plans for my future and do not want to stay in a country where my skills and capabilities are most likely going to waste.

"The Iranians do not hate you nor do they hate ur government.  This is all the media.  The people have nothing to do with the media Michael.  No one is against you here except for those on the government's side.  Unfortunately they’re not few, they’re actually many, but they won’t last forever. Someday this is all gonna turn upside down.  Sometimes I ask myself do I wanna be here for the next revolution?  I dunno ...

Comments   

 
# RE: A Young Iranian Woman Writesin_awe 2012-01-25 02:56
Thank God President Obama has been there offering moral support to the Iranian people who are wishing and hoping for change.
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+6 # RE: RE: A Young Iranian Woman Writespacific_waters 2012-01-25 04:37
Quoting in_awe:
Thank God President Obama has been there offering moral support to the Iranian people who are wishing and hoping for change.


What? What exactly has he done to support the Iranian people?
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+9 # Are You Insane?Tamminator 2012-01-25 04:47
Obama ignored the Green Revolution in 2009, when the Iranian people rose up against the regime.
Virtually ignored it.

Protesters were killed on the streets and people were dragged off to prisons and raped and tortured.

Moral support for the Iranian people from Obama?
You are delusional.
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+10 # Mr.Sola Fide 2012-01-25 04:52
:D I'm pretty sure this was said with tongue firmly planted in cheek!
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+1 # RE: RE: A Young Iranian Woman WritesSteveInSD 2012-01-25 05:28
Did you mean to use the /s switch for satire? :o
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# Well doneJust me 2012-01-25 13:48
Be sure to check the batteries in your sarcasm meter. That was a well written comment.
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+1 # RE: A Young Iranian Woman WritesTim 2012-01-25 02:57
Last I heard, there was something like 75% of the Iranian population that were pro-American and nearly half felt that U.S. policies on Iran were somewhat correct. Can you collaborate this, Michael? If so, there must be a way to support a pro-democracy movement in Iran...
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# World Opinion PollDavid Miller 2012-01-25 03:06
2008 data, Tim.

http://www.worldpublicopinion.org/pipa/articles/brmiddleeastnafricara/527.php
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+4 # The Power of FearFThomas 2012-01-25 03:14
Her statements speak strongly of the realities faced by the average Iraqi Citizen today.

"What will the future bring?"

Will there be war or civil war? She seems to conclude that it is not a matter of if, but when.

I agree with her that we are not given a clear picture by the media outlets in the United States, who in my opinion are as anti-US as the current Iraqi government she speaks of.

Additionally, having lived and worked in many Islamic countries in the past I am sure that graft and corruption play a large part as to who is the current leadership of Iraq is. Combine that with the conflict between Sunni and Shia Muslims and it is a disaster in the making.

The above assumptions seem outlandish based on the limited information available to me in her statement. But, I have tried to place myself in her situation and look at it from her perspective. She has already decided that the future in Iraq looks bleak and that leaving is the only answer.

I support our troops regardless of where our government may send them to be in harm’s way. I do not always agree with the logic behind the US political decisions made to do so.

It grieves me that many US and Coalition Forces soldier’s lives have been lost for naught. It appears that Iraq will continue to spiral into chaos.
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+5 # Wrong CountryAndyB 2012-01-25 04:05
Maybe a mere overlook, but the woman in question lives in and is speaking of Iran, not Iraq.
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# RE: Wrong CountryFThomas 2012-01-25 04:35
Quoting AndyB:
Maybe a mere overlook, but the woman in question lives in and is speaking of Iran, not Iraq.


Oops! My Bad!

I would leave out the Sunni / Shia issue but everything else stands. I will say, she is speaking of a more country state thatn Iraq.

Thanks for pointing out my glaring error.
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+1 # RE: RE: Wrong Countryhaamerhed 2012-01-25 16:42
I agree despite the typo...I'm sure Iranians look to situations in Iraq as an example to post revolution conditions of their own country. Iraqis need to stabilize the gift we provided- their own freedom. I feel many factors of their beliefs inhibit pride, repress reality of being in control of their own lives.
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+2 # Meh, So What?Sean 2012-01-25 03:15
While I feel for folks living under tyranny, this is what Islam gets you.

The sooner they all get back to killing each other off, the better off the West will be. If we somehow took out the current Iranian regime, who knows what would rise to power in it's place? I'd wager that the more ruthless of aspirants would succeed in that part of the world.

The only lesson I've learned over the past decade that intervening in Islam is a fool's errand. Defending folks from Islam is laudable, but trying to get a country filled with Muslims to even consider western-style civility is pointless. Their religion prohibits them from buying what we're trying to sell.

Islam is the new evil empire. It's always been an evil empire, but it's pre-petroleum-w ealth impotence made it's imperialism unimportant. Now that they've got our oil money, we've been forced to recognize the danger Islam represents to all mankind.

I don't care if surveys say 99% of Iranians support us: eff 'em. They'll hate our infidel backsides in a week after we land.
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+5 # RE: Meh, So What?Sean 2012-01-25 11:23
Quoting Sean:
While I feel for folks living under tyranny, this is what Islam gets you.

The sooner they all get back to killing each other off, the better off the West will be. If we somehow took out the current Iranian regime, who knows what would rise to power in it's place? I'd wager that the more ruthless of aspirants would succeed in that part of the world.

The only lesson I've learned over the past decade that intervening in Islam is a fool's errand. Defending folks from Islam is laudable, but trying to get a country filled with Muslims to even consider western-style civility is pointless. Their religion prohibits them from buying what we're trying to sell.

Islam is the new evil empire. It's always been an evil empire, but it's pre-petroleum-wealth impotence made it's imperialism unimportant. Now that they've got our oil money, we've been forced to recognize the danger Islam represents to all mankind.

I don't care if surveys say 99% of Iranians support us: eff 'em. They'll hate our infidel backsides in a week after we land.


That is a very, very sweeping generalization you made. Practicing Muslims live in nearly every major country in the world and they function just fine while adhering to "Western style civility." Blaming Islam for the way things currently are in the ME is like blaming Christianity for the Crusades. As the very letter you're responding to shows it isn't religion that's the problem; its power hungry, ruthless, greedy people.
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+2 # MrRyden 2012-01-25 13:13
So how are we (the Western world) better than them if we just sit by the side and look when they start slaughtering each other, or be content with seeing a vicous dictator remain because "who knows what would rise in it's place?" People over there might be somewhat upset that we have behaved like that in the past.
As much as I don't agree with Islam, I'd still like to point out that a lot of the violence might have something to do with the region itself, and not quite that much with the religion. Take a look at the Lebanese civil war. There were Muslims and Christians pitted against each other, and both sides behaved like they were from the 13th century of Europe, but with assault rifles.
It probably has more to do with being in the third world than being Muslim.
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+2 # RE: Meh, So What?JY 2012-01-25 16:08
"If we somehow took out the current Iranian regime"
Yeah, you know how Iran wound up a nutcase Theocracy in the first place? Because 'we' took out the independent Iranian regime in the 50s, and replaced it with a commie-hating, pro-west autocrat. Islam is an evil empire, what, are you literally twelve or something? Pack up your generalizations and your culture war BS and grow up.

"Western-style civility" that's a bit rich considering your comment.
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+10 # Young Iranian WomanLeyla Najma 2012-01-25 03:19
Wow, what a courageous young woman. I wish her the best and want her to know she has support here too!
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-1 # resnukaq@verizon.netWillis Abercrombie 2012-01-25 04:36
The imams are not likely to go to war because the know they cannot prevail. They can only make us and Israel very uncomfortable by mining the straits and that would result in a severe backlash and use up a lot of our resources. It's a no win situation and there is no evidence that Iran will have a bomb, at least for several years. Rest easy for now.
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+5 # RE: resnukaq@verizon.netJusuchin 2012-01-25 05:54
Eternal Vigilance is the price of Liberty.

Resting easy only means we're caught flatfooted when it actually happens. Better to prevent than to cure.
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-2 # RE: resnukaq@verizon.netrich 2012-01-25 13:18
As I recall, we were resting easy on September 11, 2001, and you know what that got us.
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+2 # RE: RE: resnukaq@verizon.netJust me 2012-01-25 13:56
Quoting rich:
As I recall, we were resting easy on September 11, 2001, and you know what that got us.


No, we were not. What it does go to show is that just one person with the determination to cause destruction will do so. The level of that destruction will be likely tied to the amount of time and planning they put into their act.

The security theater that you see all around us now will not stop anyone with the will to destroy. And that is fact.
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+5 # RE: A Young Iranian Woman WritesWalt 2012-01-25 04:45
Great post Mike. Thanks for sharing this point of view a lot of folks in the U.S. just don't ever hear.
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+4 # RE: A Young Iranian Woman WritesTex Taylor 2012-01-25 04:59
This is the sad fact that I have to keep reminding myself, as I believe most predominately Islamic countries a pox upon the earth, and most certainly Iran is.

However, there are millions of Muslims that are innocent victims of brutal, totalitarian regimes that will never know the freedoms I have experienced in my lifetime.

It is sometimes difficult to separate the general populace of a country from its wicked government.
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+4 # RE: A Young Iranian Woman WritesEllie 2012-01-25 05:12
Nothing will get straightened out for anyone or any country until the media is forced to change. They are the devil incarnate and have out of control power.
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+7 # Iranian peopleDallas H 2012-01-25 05:49
I knew an Iranian engineer who managed to get here right before the US embassy was taken over...he and his wife and child stayed and became a US citizen, but he stayed in touch with their relatives. He told me then that most of the Iranians he knew then were very pro-American & pro-West. He was ecstatic to be both Iranian and American, it was his great pride.
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+4 # RE: A Young Iranian Woman WritesMatt 2012-01-25 05:53
Yup. But I feel the same way about my government in the USA. I am thinking of leaving and probably will if Obama gets re-elected. I am sick of the fascist BS at airport security, and the crony capitalism on the Hill, the bribes, the insider trading, etc. It is becoming like a 3rd world nation. And I have spent a lot of time in Central America and know about corruption; and let me tell you we are becoming just like them. So let's not spill blood because this woman detests her government. Lets solve our problems here first. Unless you prefer to wait until we are just like them.
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+1 # RE: RE: A Young Iranian Woman WritesYmmot Siorrrab 2012-01-25 17:41
"I have spent a lot of time in Central America and know about corruption; and let me tell you we are becoming just like them."

What U talkin bout?

The US is where all foreign countries learn how to be corrupt!
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-5 # RE: A Young Iranian Woman WritesTatterdemalian 2012-01-25 06:00
"No one is against you here except for those on the government's side."

And if it wasn't for our enemies, we'd all be friends. Nice to see the Iranians have mastered the art of doublespeak, but I guess it comes more easily after having learned doublethink in the Revolution.
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+3 # PerhapsJohn - Capt in ANG 2012-01-25 07:24
I had to re-read it a few times. However, before you're quick to judge others harshly and negatively, give them the benefit of the doubt first. Perhaps you just don't understand what she's saying. Unlike here in the US, she's putting her personal security and her family's at risk by simply reaching out at all.

That said, I believe she's meaning that those against the US Government are mostly in that boat because their government, which they are loyal to, are against the US. Meaning, if the Iranian President said tomorrow Malibu Barbie is the best and he endorses Newt Gingrich, they would potentially be Pro-US on Election Night, Nov '12.
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-2 # RE: PerhapsTatterdemalian 2012-01-26 00:02
You're so willing to go over my words with a fine-tooth comb to pretend you can read my mind, but you should be paying more attention to what our Iranian friend is saying, because what she is pining for is the exact opposite of democracy. Even after redacting and editing, the fact remains in her excerpt that pro-mullah and pro-theocracy Iranians are the majority. Getting her wish would entail establishing a pro-West dictatorship, necessarily a militant one to avoid being overthrown by force let alone by popular vote, and subjecting the anti-West majority to political oppression at the very minimum.

The diametric opposite was true in Iraq, with a pro-West Shia and Kurd majority oppressed by a minority Baathist military dictatorship. This Iranian "friend," even when trying to appeal to us on an emotional level, doesn't even try to convince us that her views are a majority opinion in Iran, because one look at the weekly "Death to America" rallies makes any such claim look absurd.
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+5 # RE: A Young Iranian Woman Writesdennymack 2012-01-25 06:32
Beware our very common mistake of thinking that the people who we make contacts with in foreign countries represent the population. They may, but often they represent a sliver of society that is more wealthy, urban, educated, and familiar with the West.
The engineer or writer that you meet may see things similarly to you, but the farmer or delivery guy you never talked to may have never thought in the same terms that this woman does.
At the very least, an English speaker with email and a Western contact represents a minority. That doesn't mean the rest love the government, but they may see the situation (and the US) very differently. Propaganda from a regime they despise and mistrust may still work on them. What else do they have to know us from?
Dennymack
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+2 # On IraniansComrade_Tovarich 2012-01-25 15:42
An English speaker with email and a Western (better yet, developed world to include Japan, Taiwan, etc.) contact is a minority, but not a small one. There are many Iranians with friends and family abroad. During my years teaching English in East Asia, I met a number of Iranians, mostly elite: visiting researchers and profs, grad students (almost always in the sciences). None loved the mullahs; most were proud to be Iranian (and ridiculed the Arabs) but were often looking at ways not to return to Iran, because all was stifled there. I did not meet many of the low-level Iranians doing menial work (and/or drug smuggling), but the elite Iranians looked down on them: "Ask them what part of Tehran they're from," because it would be some ghetto.

LA's large affluent Iranian community provides much programming that is happily consumed in Iran. Studying English is common, as are computers. Iran is not wealthy or free, but it is not a Turd World country. Iranians take pains to clarify they are not Arabs, whom they generally dislike.

On 9/11, the first person to call me--before I even knew what was happening back in the US--was a domestic student. The next was an Iranian foreign student. Iranians later took to the streets in solidarity with the people of the US, whereas the Palestinians and others celebrated.

On those big "Death to America" protests, I was told young Iranians love them because they are the only gov't-sanctione d public events. At a protest, you can be young, raucous, and mingle with the opposite sex. At no other time can you have fun without the gov't cracking your head. Yes, they're shouting "Death to America" but it's an empty slogan for most. They know the cynicism.

I study with a young Iranian-America n who travels to/from Iran occasionally. The picture I get is, I assume, like the Soviet Union: The majority know they're being screwed, but there is little they can do, so they try to escape.
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+3 # Now here is more truth on IranYmmot Siorrrab 2012-01-25 18:08
Nice use of the same word twice "Comrade"

You are right Iranians are NOT Arabs and they will quickly correct you!

Iranians are far more "westernized" than people know or want to believe.

It's the greedy grubby snot gobbling mullahs and their sycophants, currently ruling the country who are causing all the negative impressions of the Iranian people.
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+1 # MrRyden 2012-01-25 21:16
If I recall correctly, common Iranians actually placed thousands of candles in some Tehran soccer stadium for the victims, all with the approval of the regime in the wake of 9/11.
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+4 # IranRob Hise-Denk 2012-01-25 06:46
We made serious foreign policy mistakes in the past that were intended to confront Islamic fundamentalism but ended up just isolating their people. I strongly believe that Iran, Cuba, and North Korea would be much less of a problem/threat if we stopped isolating them. A little bit of exposure to American cinema and music will do much more than any embargo.
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# RE: IranLibby 2012-01-25 14:45
Cuba is far from isolated, despite the U.S. embargo. Many, many Cubans have family members in the U.S. who send money to them and occasionally visit. And Cuban hotels are full of Canadian and European tourists. It's not for lack of exposure to U.S. culture that Cuba remains a police state.
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+3 # Glad she sent this and allowed it publishedJohn - Capt in ANG 2012-01-25 07:32
I have often wondered what the "average" person in Iran thinks of all this. When Iran's President Ahamanutjob makes his threats, he's playing with their security. When he pursues his nuclear objectives, the UN and US sanctions hurt the Iranian population (not the President). As much as I don't like Obama, I would agree with the earlier comments that he's trying to support the Iranian population within the bounds he has. We have the political will and the embargoes in place, but Obama has, from what I've been reading, withheld putting them into practice. In other words, we can financially "whack the knuckles" of anyone sending Iran money (for oil, for example), but we haven't enforced it or taken any action (yet).

To the young women who wrote this, thank you. It's great to hear someone elses perspective. This is why, as I travel Afghanistan, I stop anytime a local asks and I spend time trying to learn and understand their view of Afghanistan, Islam, the US, and the World. We're all on this big, blue marble together.
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+1 # Iranian FreedomsTehran Steve 2012-01-25 12:39
I'm an American who lived in just prior to the revolution. I was really surprised that there were enough anti-west allies of the government to make the revolution happen. I had MANY Iranian friends and ALL of them loved the freedoms provided to them under the Shah's pseudo westernized government, and I'm sure that they'd prefer to go back to those days in a heartbeat! Sure, the Shah had to exercise some ruthless tactics in order to hold the clerics in place, but that didn't affect the freedom loving younger people in Iran.

I still correspond with some Iranians and they are not happy at all with the way things are. If they new that the west would support them fully if they tried another revolution, they'd do it in a heartbeat. The problem with this proposition is what happens with the government after an overthrow? We have all seen what happens in places like Egypt, Somolia, Libya, etc. This regions has an extremely long history of instability and I'm afraid that this is just the nature of the people.... sad, because most of them are very good people.
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# Mr.Brian 2012-01-25 14:06
Quoting Tehran Steve:
I'm an American who lived in just prior to the revolution. I was really surprised that there were enough anti-west allies of the government to make the revolution happen. I had MANY Iranian friends and ALL of them loved the freedoms provided to them under the Shah's pseudo westernized government, and I'm sure that they'd prefer to go back to those days in a heartbeat! Sure, the Shah had to exercise some ruthless tactics in order to hold the clerics in place, but that didn't affect the freedom loving younger people in Iran.

I still correspond with some Iranians and they are not happy at all with the way things are. If they new that the west would support them fully if they tried another revolution, they'd do it in a heartbeat. The problem with this proposition is what happens with the government after an overthrow? We have all seen what happens in places like Egypt, Somolia, Libya, etc. This regions has an extremely long history of instability and I'm afraid that this is just the nature of the people.... sad, because most of them are very good people.

Brian
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+1 # RE: Mr.Brian 2012-01-25 14:19
It is just as delusional to think that all Iranians love the US as it is to think that Obama has done anything for anti-clerics in Iran. The CIA at the urging of the Brits, who did not want BP nationalized, engineered the overthrow of Iran's democratically elected government and installed the Shah of Iran.The Shah's government was at least as ruthless as today's government in Iran. The middle-class in Iran and many of the students are anti-clerical but not necessarily pro-USA. How could they be after what we did? The government there today is a religious dictatorship but they are not stupid. They understand the power of the oil companies, having been shafted once already. I agree with Matt above. The middle class is disappearing here . We could not fight a large scale non-nuclear war because production is disappearing in the USA. Our media all follow the same "Party Line". When people like Barack Obama or Newt Gingrich can be considered for President, you know we are in trouble here.
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+1 # RE: Mr.Tehran Steve 2012-01-25 22:14
Brian --I didn't say that all Iranians loved Americans. My point was that the majority loved the freedoms that they had before the revolution. I know, I lived there!!! Were you there to see for yourself how "Ruthless" the Shah was to the common people? You've been reading too many spy novels. Like I stated in my original post... the Shah did what he had to do to keep the radical clerics at bay. The common Iranians knew his position and they knew as long as that line wasn't crossed, they had no problems with the Shah. Again, I lived there at that time -- my knowledge of this doesn't come from reading the CIA factbook website......
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-4 # RE: A Young Iranian Woman WritesAsif Ali 2012-01-25 13:34
I think we should look into this with a different perspective. In the wake of a "fake Khomeni" landing in Iran and turning the world around for the Iranians BUT at the liking of MI6 & CIA. The responsibles were MI6 as the real Khomeini had 9 fingers and the one landed in Tehran had all 10.

So the bottomline is, when the Freemasonry/Ill uminatis work they make sure that both the Wrestlers in the Arena belongs to one owner...are you catching my drift?
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-4 # RE: A Young Iranian Woman WritesAsif Ali 2012-01-25 13:53
Or try reading the following:

1- Planned World Order: Related Articles
Contents:
Diplomacy by Deception by Dr. John Coleman
2 - En Route to Global Occupation by Gary H. Kah
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-4 # RE: A Young Iranian Woman WritesAsif Ali 2012-01-25 13:54
...or try reading the following:

1-Planned World Order: Related Articles
Contents:
Diplomacy by Deception by Dr. John Coleman

2-En Route to Global Occupation by Gary H. Kah
Thanks
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-1 # RE: A Young Iranian Woman WritesBob Burrichter 2012-01-25 18:22
Oh that our President and Secretary of State had spoken out several years ago when Iranians took to the streets... as they did concerning Egypt throwing Mubarak under the bus.
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+1 # Too badJohn_G 2012-01-26 03:30
We're going to blow this off till Israel doesn't have a choice and a lot of these kinds of people are going to get hurt or dead - which will make them rally to the regime, and get more of them dead, as the global consequences of Hormuz are astounding. Nothing like ignorance, ego and hubris to fill caskets - the Mullahs aren't kidding about, and martyrdom is just fine for the civilian population. If there is a way to help them get out, help them get out.
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+1 # RE: A Young Iranian Woman WritesWilliam Gentry 2012-01-26 14:13
Many people do not know this but the day after 9/11 nearly 20,000 Iranians were in the streets of Tehran shouting "Death to terrorist, support USA" unlike in the arab world where they were saying the opposite.
Unfortunately the Iranian government opperates under the muslim philosophy of "The enemy of my enemy is my friend."
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# MrRyden 2012-01-26 17:51
At that time, and around Iraqi Freedom, the regime in Tehran was actually closer to opening up to the West than they'd been since the Shad, mainly due to being quite scared that they were up for an invasion right after Iraq. Of course that didn't last very long when they saw how badly things went in Iraq after just a couple of months and someone saw fit to include them in the "Axis of evil" together with one country they hated (Iraq) and another with which they had hardly ever spoken to (N. Korea).

The time between 9/11 and those things might've been opportunities we'll never see again.
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# that's not fair....said 2012-09-08 15:05
hi
i'm a young screenwriter who lives in Iran..its really not fair i have done my best i have written so many scripts...so many ideas...but there is no support...and that's because they don't like the idea and with "they" i mean the government, they support only those writters an directors who make what they like and want to be maked... they put everything to politic's way and then they refuse it...i desperately need support...pleas e help me
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# RE: A Young Iranian Woman WritesTMI 2012-11-09 21:00
Iran was hijacked by Islam centuries ago. Somehow the people continue to have traces of their Persian roots which created many wonders in their time. It all came to an end when Islam conquered their country with brutality, slavery and slaughter unless they converted to Islam.
Of all Muslims, I have little hope for anyone else except the Persians.
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